How To Study The Bible

Sometimes extra resources help us uncover more meaning behind what the Bible says. We’ve got history here, plus helpful commentaries from KJV readers of past centuries. Enjoy!

STUDY

The King James Bible

We’ve put together some resources to help you as you dig into your King James Bible. Blogs, commentary and a verse finder will help when you are looking into a particular theme or passage.

“Study to shew thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth.”   2 Timothy 3:15

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Helpful Blog Posts

Whether you are looking for historical background on the KJV, or if you’d like practical advice on approaching Bible study, there are posts to help. 

Coming Soon

Matthew Henry’s Commentary

Matthew Henry was a minister in Chester, England during the turn of the 18th century.  His beloved 6 volume Complete Commentary contains helpful notes on every verse of the King James Version Bible, and in the same wonderful language.

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Coming Soon

Verses by Topic

Whether you want to know what God’s word says about the future, want to know deeper contentment, or need words of comfort for a friend, you can search for targeted verses.

A Historical Timeline

OF THE KJV BIBLE

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What’s the difference between Bible translations?

The Bible was originally written in Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek.

There are two main philosophies behind translating the Bible, and they range on a continuum between:

1

Word-for-Word

Adhering to the words and structure of the original language without sacrificing clarity.

2

Thought-for-Thought

Prioritizing clarity and understanding of the meaning of the original language without sacrificing accuracy.

Read more about translations below.
  1. Interlinear Bible
    Year Published: 2005
    Distinctives: See the text from your KJV English translation seen alongside the original Greek and Hebrew, great for Bible teachers and scholars.

  2. New American Standard Bible (NASB)
    Year Published: Gospel of John (1960); New Testament (1963); Complete Bible (1971); Most recent revision (2020)
    Distinctives: Widely considered the most accurate text for preaching and teaching, though not necessarily reading.

  3. Amplified Bible (AMP)
    Year Published: Gospel of John (1954); New Testament (1958); Complete Bible (1965) Most recent revision (2015)
    Distinctives: Multiple word or idea meanings included within the text. Brings your study notes right into the passage.

  4. English Standard Version (ESV)
    Year Published: 2001; revisions 2011 and 2016
    Distinctives: A more readable word-for-word translation than the NASB, but using more recently discovered manuscripts than the KJV.

  5. Revised Standard Version (RSV)
    Year Published: New Testament (1946); Complete Bible (1952); revision 1971
    Distinctives: First to use newly discovered, more ancient manuscripts including the Dead Sea Scrolls’ Isaiah manuscript. A favorite of academics and scholars.

  6. King James Version (KJV)
    Year Published: 1611
    Distinctives: The gold standard in translation for its time and for 400 years, poetic 17th century language is known worldwide.

  7. New King James Version (NKJV)
    Year Published: New Testament (1979); Psalms (1980); Complete Bible (1982)
    Distinctives: Same manuscripts as the original KJV, but brings the language up-to-date with 20th century English.

  8. Modern English Version (MEV)
    Year Published: New Testament (2011); Complete Bible (2014)
    Distinctives: Like the NKJV, uses the KJV and its manuscripts as a base, while bringing its English language all the way up to 21st century standards.
  1. Christian Standard Bible (CSB)
    Year Published: Complete Bible (2017); updated 2020
    Distinctives: Balances a literal translation with expression in modern, simplified language for maximized readability.

  2. New Revised Standard Version (NRSV)
    Year Published: Complete Bible (1989); Updated Edition (2021)
    Distinctives: More thought-for thought than the RSV, and embraced by Roman Catholics, Greek Orthodox, as well as Jewish scholars for the Old Testament.

  3. Evangelical Heritage Version (EHV)
    Year Published: New Testament (2017); Complete Bible (2019)
    Distinctives: Uses a unique mixture of manuscripts, every translator came from the Lutheran tradition. Extensive footnotes.

  4. New English Translation (NET)
    Year Published: Complete Bible (2001); latest revision (2019)
    Distinctives: First online Bible, readable for the lay person, technical translator notes great for students and missionaries.

  5. New American Bible Revised Edition (NABRE)
    Year Published: Complete Bible (1986); latest revision (2011) Committee: 55 editors, consultants, and revisers

  6. New International Version (NIV)
    Year Published: New Testament (1973); Complete Bible (1978); Major Revisions (1984 and 2011)
    Distinctives:  First modern translation to achieve popular use since the King James Version, 10 year translation project.

  7. International Standard Version (ISV)
    Year Published: Electronic version (2011); Release 2.0 (2015)
    Distinctives: Uses a digital-only format, with version numbers for updates, though difficult to find online.

  8. GOD’S WORD Translation (GW)
    Year Published: Complete Bible (1995); latest revision (2020)
    Distinctives: It’s focus on easy reading make this translation great for ESL speakers and first-time Bible readers.
  1. New Century Version (NCV)
    Year Published: New Testament (1983); Complete Bible (1987)
    Distinctives: A revision of the International Children’s Bible (ICB), the language is purposefully simplified and gender-neutral.

  2. New Living Translation (NLT)
    Year Published: Complete Bible (1996); latest revision (2015)
    Distinctives: An update to The Living Bible paraphrase that goes back to original manuscripts. Accuracy in clear natural English is the goal.

  3. Common English Bible (CEB)
    Year Published: New Testament (2010); Complete Bible (2011)
    Distinctives: Produced by a wholly ecumenical team and used teenagers to read and test how well the text was understood.

  4. Good News Bible (GNB)/Good News Translation (GNT)
    Year Published: Complete Bible (1976); Second Edition (1992); GNT (2001)
    Distinctives: The goal is easy-to-read Bibles, published as inexpensive paperbacks, easy to distribute, used by Billy Graham Association.

  5. Easy-to-Read Version (ERV)
    Year Published: 2006; 2015
    Distinctives: Aiming for a 3rd-grade reading level, this Bible is the easiest to read version available today.

  6. Contemporary English Version (CEV)
    Year Published: New Testament (1991); Complete Bible (1995)
    Distinctives: Aimed at both a lower reading level and no biblical literacy – criticisms say the paraphrase eliminates theological truth.

  7. The Living Bible
    Year Published: 1967 Living New Testament, 1971 The Living Bible, Paraphrased
    Distinctives: Written by businessman Ken Taylor to put the Scripture in an understandable form for family Bible reading.

  8. The Voice (VOICE)
    Year Published: New Testament (2011); Complete Bible (2012)
    Distinctives: The Voice has incorporated writers, poets, artists, and even musicians into its editorial team. Aim to “tell the story of Scripture.”

  9. The Message (MSG)
    Year Published:  Portions of the Bible beginning (1993), Complete Bible (2002); Latest Revision (2018)
    Distinctives: Recommended for use alongside your Word-for-Word translation. Many find The Message gives fresh inspiration on Scripture.